Monday, December 30, 2013

NISO Webinar: From Device to Device: Adaptive Interfaces for Content > January 8 2014 > 1:00 - 2:30 PM (ET)

About the Webinar

Content providers and libraries are struggling with the bests way to make their e-content adapt to the wide diversity of devices—including desktops, laptops, tablets, e-readers, and smartphones. For decades, the PDF document format has been the fallback for digital content display, despite its shortcomings. But new developments and standards from file formats to improved cascading style sheets, adaptive layouts, graphics scaling, and device recognition are encouraging the move away from PDF, but many challenges remain. When is reflowable text or fixed layout the best approach? Can a user have a common experience regardless of device being used or should the goal be to provide the best experience for the particular device? How can authors and publishers ensure that specialized content such as graphics and tables are not lost or garbled when presented to a smaller screen? Is there an efficient way to produce and distribute content without re-creating it for every different potential device and format? Is it possible to create device-agnostic content?

Understanding these issues is critical both for publishers who need to efficiently distribute content and for libraries who will be purchasing this content and ensuring their patrons, with their variety of devices, can access the electronic content they need. This webinar will describe some advances in adaptive publication design and provide a basis for what you can expect for making content device agnostic.

Agenda

Introduction

Todd Carpenter, Managing Director, NISO

Jean Kaplansky - Digital Content Solutions Architect, Aptara

Jean Kaplansky is a Digital Content Solutions Architect at Aptara, which provides digital publishing solutions to content providers for capitalizing on new digital and mobile mediums. Jean is an avid reader and early adopter of eBooks and eBook-related technology, going back to 1996. Her publishing production past includes work as an XML Architect for Cengage Learning, a Systems Analyst for Pfizer Global Research and Development, and an XML Consultant at Arbortext. Jean is an Invited Expert to the W3C's Digital Publishing Interest Group and currently sits on the IDPF Indexing, Open Annotation, and EDUPUB working groups in addition to the BISG Content Structure Committee. Follow her occasional tweets at @JeanKaplansky.

Toby Plewak - Product Strategist, Publishing Technology

Toby Plewak is Product Strategist for Publishing Technology’s pub2web platform.

Registration Costs

  • NISO Member
    • $95.00 (US and Canada)
    • $109.00 (International)
  • NASIG Member
    • $95.00
  • Non-Member
    • $125.00 (US and Canada)
    • $149.00 (International)
  • Student
    • $49.00
Registration closes on January 8, 2014 at 12:00 p.m. (ET) 

Source and Registration Link Available At:

[http://www.niso.org/news/events/2014/webinars/device/]

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

What the Open Access Button Means for the Future of Research and Publishing

Barbie E. Keiser   / December 17, 2013

 The Open Access Button is designed to help researchers easily report when they hit a publisher paywall and are unable to access scholarly publications (because they lack a paid subscription to a particular journal or database or have not otherwise paid an access fee for the document). The button, an easy-to-use browser bookmarklet, searches for alternative access to the article, identifying open access versions of articles/research on the internet while mapping where obstacles are inhibiting research advances around the world. Researchers can complete an optional short form to add their experience to a map along with thousands of others located around the world. This visualization depicts the worldwide impact of paywalls on research, building a picture of where obstacles are placed in the way of research, inhibiting collaboration and possibly delaying innovations.

Launched on Nov. 18, 2013, at the Berlin 11 Student and Early Stage Researcher Satellite Conference of the Berlin 11 Open Access Conference, the Open Access Button “tracks how often readers are denied access to academic research, where in the world they were or their profession and why they were looking for that research,” aggregating the information in “one place, creating a real time, worldwide, interactive picture of the problem,” according to a blog post at the Public Library of Science. The button was developed in response to the frustrations of two medical students, David Carroll (Queens University Belfast) and Joseph McArthur (University College London), who repeatedly encountered difficulties in gaining access to academic research results they needed for their work.

[more]

Monday, December 16, 2013

MIT Technology Review > Can Automated Editorial Tools Help Wikipedia's Declining Volunteer Workforce?


An algorithm that assesses the quality of Wikipedia articles could reassure visitors and help focus editors on entries that need improving, say the computer scientists who developed it.

Today, we get an answer thanks to the work of Xiangju Qin and Pádraig Cunningham at University College Dublin in Ireland. These guys have developed an algorithm that assesses the quality of Wikipedia pages based on the authoritativeness of the editors involved and the longevity of the edits they have made.

“The hypothesis is that pages with significant contributions from authoritative contributors are likely to be high-quality pages,” they say. Given this information, visitors to Wikipedia should be able to judge the quality of any article much more accurately.

Various groups have studied the quality of Wikipedia articles and how to measure this in the past. The novelty of this work is in combining existing measures in a new way.

[more]

Source and Full Text Available At

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

Visuwords™ Online Graphical Dictionary


Visuwords™ online graphical dictionary — Look up words to find their meanings and associations with other words and concepts. Produce diagrams reminiscent of a neural net. Learn how words associate.

Enter words into the search box to look them up or double-click a node to expand the tree. Click and drag the background to pan around and use the mouse wheel to zoom. Hover over nodes to see the definition and click and drag individual nodes to move them around to help clarify connections.

  • It's a dictionary! It's a thesaurus!
  • Great for writers, journalists, students, teachers, and artists.
  • The online dictionary is available wherever there’s an internet connection.
  • No membership required.
Visuwords™ uses Princeton University’s WordNet, an opensource database built by University students and language researchers. Combined with a visualization tool and user interface built from a combination of modern web technologies, Visuwords™ is available as a free resource to all patrons of the web.

The Visuwords™ Interface

To use the applet you only need to type a word into the search query at the top of the page and press 'Enter'. A network of nodes or 'synsets' will spring out from the word that you entered. A synset is essentially a single concept that is represented by a number of terms or synonyms. Synonyms are words with different spellings that convey the same idea. For example when you lookup "seem", you see that the word is connected to four synsets each represented by a green circle. Green denotes verbs so all of these synsets represent verbs. Two of these synsets have the lone word "seem"; one has two terms: "appear" and "seem"; and the third has three terms: "look", "appear" and "seem". Each of the four synsets has its own definition. Hovering over a node with the mouse will reveal all of the synonyms for a given synset as well as its definition. Some synsets will also show a few examples of usage. These synsets link to each other and to other synsets according to entries in the WordNet database.

You can zoom the model in and out by rolling the wheel on your mouse. You can click the gray background within the applet and drag the mouse in order to shift the whole model around so you can explore. You can grab any node and pull it away from the others to clarify connections.

Source and Link Available At:

[http://www.visuwords.com]

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

FREE Webinar > Using Doctoral Theses in Your Research: A Guide to EThOS > Database for PhD Theses Managed by the British Library

6:00 AM - 7:00 AM (EDT)

EThOS (http://ethos.bl.uk) is the national database for PhD theses, managed by the British Library. It’s a fantastic resource for researchers, with over 100,000 UK theses freely available to download and use for your own research, and another 200,000 available to search and scan on demand.

Join us for a free webinar to learn how EThOS works. Find out how to search for and download theses, and what to do if a thesis isn’t available. If you’re a PhD student, find out what will happen to your thesis once it’s completed. We’ll also explain how EThOS works with UK universities to support the whole research cycle, making the theses more visible and available for new researchers to use and build on. 
 
Host: Sara Gould, Development Manager at the British Library, who manages the EThOS service. Sara will answer questions after the webinar.

Source and Registration Available At 


EThOS: Free Downloads Of UK Dissertations/Theses From The British Library

 

Tuesday, November 26, 2013

Google Scholar Library


Tuesday, November 19, 2013 | 11:30 PM

Today we’re launching Scholar Library, your personal collection of articles in Scholar. You can save articles right from the search page, organize them by topic, and use the power of Scholar's full-text search & ranking to quickly find just the one you want - at any time and from anywhere. You decide what goes into your library and we’ll provide all the goodies that come with Scholar search results - up to date article links, citing articles, related articles, formatted citations, links to your university’s subscriptions, and more. And if you have a public Scholar profile, it’s easy to quickly set up your library with the articles you want - with a single click, you can import all the articles in your profile as well as all the articles they cite.[Link]


Here’s how it looks. Click “Save” below a search result to save it to your library. Click “My library” to see all the articles in your library and search their full text. You can also use labels to organize your articles. To get you started we’ve created two labels, “My Citations” and “Cited by me”, based on your Scholar profile, if you have one. “My Citations” contains your profile articles and “Cited by me” contains articles you’ve cited.[Link]

Source and Links Available At:

[http://googlescholar.blogspot.com/2013/11/google-scholar-library.html]

Monday, November 18, 2013

Launch of Open Access Button

oabutton
The Open Access Button is a browser-based tool that lets users track when they are denied access to research, then search for alternative access to the article.  Each time a user encounters a paywall, he simply clicks the button in his bookmark bar, fills out an optional dialogue box, and his experience is added to a map alongside other users.  Then, the user receives a link to search for free access to the article using resources such as Google Scholar. The Open Access Button initiative hopes to create a worldwide map showing the impact of denied access to research.

[more]

Source and Full Text Available At:

Friday, November 8, 2013

Surveys of Distant Learner Awareness of Library Resources and Services ?

Colleagues/

Speaking of Surveys of Distant Learners ...

Have others conducted a survey of distant learners with regard to their awareness of library resources and services ?

Although I will conduct a systematic literature and web review, I'd appreciate learning of any / all surveys and will post.

Thanks !

/Gerry

Gerry McKiernan
Associate Professor
and
Science and Technology Librarian
Iowa State University
152 Parks Library
Ames IA 50011

"It's Not The Journey; It's The Detours."

 http://ref-notes.blogspot.com/2013/09/its-not-journey-its-detours.html

Thursday, November 7, 2013

Effective Strategies for Promoting Library Resources and Services to Distant Learners ?

Colleagues/

I am greatly interested in learning "Effective Strategies for Promoting Library Resources and Services to Distant Learners." I reviewing the results of a recent survey of distant learning students with regard to their awareness of library resources and services I was quite dismayed that a significant percentage were not.

Note: Respondents learned about services and features from the survey.

Awareness of several key e-Library features was significantly low.

For such features as course reserve, ‘Ask Us’, interlibrary loan, databases, electronic journals, library research guides, the percentage of students who were not was more than 40%, with the latter over 50%.

BTW: I'm not in interested in creating resources and general services for distant learner per se, but in strategies for _promoting_ them:

For example : Use of social media, asynchronous/synchronous webinars, targeted communication by subject librarians, etc.

BTW: While I will be conducting a systematic literature and web review, I am also interested in learning of any / all publications / resources on the topic.

Note: I will be posting (other) strategies and relevant literature and web resources >  Stay Tuned ...

Thanks for your assistance !

/Gerry

Gerry McKiernan
Associate Professor
and
Science and Technology Librarian
Iowa State University
152 Parks Library
Ames IA 50011

"It's Not The Journey; It's The Detours."

 http://ref-notes.blogspot.com/2013/09/its-not-journey-its-detours.html

Sunday, September 22, 2013

Survey on Relative Significance of Conference / Workshop / Other Professional Participation > NATIONAL | INTERNATIONAL

Colleagues/

I am greatly interested in your views of the relative significance of types of professional activities and would appreciate your response to a survey.

This survey is anonymous and all results will only be available in the aggregate.

The link to the survey is (now) available at

[http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/SZWTF2S]

It should take no more 5-7 minutes to complete.

Thanks for you assistance.

BTW: If you have not participated in an analogous survey, please consider do so. It is available via

[http://ref-notes.blogspot.com/2013/09/alpha-version-survey-on-relative.html]

/Gerry

Gerry McKiernan
Associate Professor
and
Science and Technology Librarian
Iowa State University
Ames IA 50011

"It's Not The Journey; It's The Detours."
http://ref-notes.blogspot.com/2013/09/its-not-journey-its-detours.html

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Survey on Relative Significance of Conference / Workshop / Other Professional Participation > LOCAL | STATE | REGIONAL

Colleagues/

I am greatly interested in your views of the relative significance of types of professional activities and would appreciate your response to a survey.

This survey is anonymous and all results will only be available in the aggregate.

The link to the survey is (now) available at

[http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/GTKYYMF] (09-18-13)

It should take no more 5-7 minutes to complete.

Thanks for you assistance.

Note: A similar survey relating to National | International participation will be available in the near future.

/Gerry

Gerry McKiernan
Associate Professor
and
Science and Technology Librarian
Iowa State University
Ames IA 50011

"It's Not The Journey; It's The Detours."
http://ref-notes.blogspot.com/2013/09/its-not-journey-its-detours.html


Sunday, September 15, 2013

edanz > Journal Advisor > Journal Selector

What is Journal Selector?

The Journal Selector uses cutting-edge semantic technology to help you achieve publication success. Enter your abstract or sample text and the Journal Selector returns a list of journals that publish in related areas. You can refine your results based on the factors that matter to you, like publication frequency, Impact Factor or publishing model, including open access.

Who developed Journal Selector?

Journal Selector is developed by Edanz. They are recognized as the author-centric English editing company. They focus on providing a variety of services, free and paid for, to authors for whom English is not their first language. They aim to help these authors achieve their publication goals by giving them tools, helpful materials and training seminars to overcome barriers to publication.

Journal SelectorOne of the resource that they provided online is the Journal Selector, and other like materials (visit the Springer Author Academy developed by Edanz), and training seminars and workshops to authors who might not otherwise have access to the resources that are available in countries where English is the native language.

Their main success as an English editing service, and the level of success of their author outreach program, is measured by the extent of every author’s publication success

Thanks to Hazman Aziz for the HeadsUp !

Source and Links Available At 

Friday, September 6, 2013

JournalRate: Academic Journal Search Tool

Journal Rate is a searchable database of thousands of academic journals helping researchers in all fields find the appropriate journal to submit their research to. Academics can search by keyword or scope and refine their search by impact factor to help direct them to the leading journals in their respective fields. Additionally, researchers are encouraged to rate and review their experiences with each journal they have submitted to. By leaving feedback on aspects such as ease of submission process, the cost to publish, and the quality of peer reviews, other academics will be better equipped to make informed decisions regarding where they choose to publish.



Source and Link Available At:

[http://www.journalrate.com/]

Thursday, September 5, 2013

Figshare for Institutions


Solving the research data management problem for educational research institutions.

by Mark Hahnel

figshare today announces the launch of ‘figshare for Institutions’ - a simple and cost-effective software solution for academic and higher education establishments to both securely host and make publicly available its academic research outputs. figshare, allows academic institutions to publish, share and get credit for their research data, hosting videos, datasets, posters, figures and theses in a cost-effective way.

Included:

  • Large amounts of secure, private storage plus unlimited public space.
  • Simple, institution-wide management and monitoring of all research outputs for institution staff with subject categorisation per department
  • Access controlled team sharing and collaborative spaces with the ability to add notes and comments to files.
  • An institutional dashboard with detailed metrics on the impact of publicly available data
  • All research outputs can be made citable, visualisable, embeddable and trackable with one click.
  • The ability to push research to any internal repository.
  • Institution–wide compliance with open data requirements of funding bodies.
  • Dedicated support team.

With new funder mandates, researchers as well as institutions are faced with a research data management problem. figshare for institutions provides a solution for both of these stakeholders by catering to their individual needs. For researchers, they are given large amounts of private storage space, to better manage their research outputs in the cloud. The intuitive interface, which academics rarely get to see, allows them to quickly upload their data and just as easily find the files again by filtering on keywords and the type of file. When it comes to complying with mandates, these research outputs are then just one click away from being made openly and persistently available, as well as citable and trackable via a Digital Object Identifier (DOI). These publicly available files are aggregated at the departmental and institutional level, automatically providing a self-populating institutional repository with reporting capabilities.

[more]

Source and Full Text Available At:

[http://figshare.com/blog/Solving_the_research_data_management_problem_for_educational_research_institutions./96]

Thursday, August 29, 2013

Shodhganga: A Reservoir of Indian Theses


Theses and dissertations are known to be the rich and unique source of information, often the only source of research work that does not find its way into various publication channels. Theses and dissertations remain an un-tapped and under-utilized asset, leading to unnecessary duplication and repetition that, in effect, is the anti-theses of research and wastage of huge resources, both human and financial.

The UGC Notification (Minimum Standards & Procedure for Award of M.Phil. / Ph.D Degree, Regulation, 2009) dated 1st June 2009 mandates submission of electronic version of theses and dissertations by the researchers in universities with an aim to facilitate open access to Indian theses and dissertations to the academic community world-wide. Online availability of electronic theses through centrally-maintained digital repositories, not only ensure easy access and archiving of Indian doctoral theses but will also help in raising the standard and quality of research. This would overcome serious problem of duplication of research and poor quality resulting from the "poor visibility" and the "unseen" factor in research output. As per the Regulation, the responsibility of hosting, maintaining and making the digital repository of Indian Electronic Theses and Dissertation (called "Shodhganga"), accessible to all institutions and universities, is assigned to the INFLIBNET Centre.

"Shodhganga" is the name coined to denote digital repository of Indian Electronic Theses and Dissertations set-up by the INFLIBNET Centre. The word "Shodh" originates from Sanskrit and stands for research and discovery. The "Ganga" is the holiest, largest and longest of all rivers in Indian subcontinent. The Ganga is the symbol of India's age-long culture and civilisation, everchanging, ever-flowing, ever-loved and revered by its people, and has held India's heart captive and drawn uncounted millions to her banks since the dawn of history. Shodhganga stands for the reservoir of Indian intellectual output stored in a repository hosted and maintained by the INFLIBNET Centre.

The Shodhganga@INFLIBNET is set-up using an open source digital repository software called DSpace developed by MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) in partnership between Hewlett- Packard (HP). The DSpace uses internationally recognized protocols and interoperability standards. Shodhganga provides a platform for research scholars to deposit their Ph.D. theses and make it available to the entire scholarly community in open access. The repository has the ability to capture, index, store, disseminate and preserve ETDs (Electronic Theses and Dissertations) submitted by the researchers.

DSpace supports "Open Archives Initiative's Protocol for Metadata Harvesting" (OAI-PMH) and uses a qualified version of the Dublin Core schema for its metadata. The INFLIBNET Centre, promotes setting-up of institutional and ETD repositories in member universities using OAI-PMH complaint software. A number of member universities have already set-up their institutional and ETD repositories using either DSpace or other OAI-PMH compliant Institutional Repository software. It would be possible for universities having sufficient network and computing infrastructure to maintain their own ETD repositories wherein their research scholars could deposit e-versions of their theses and dissertations. Moreover, they can use Shodhganga to host their theses as backup archives. INFLIBNET Centre, besides maintaining the Central ETD Repository (Shodhganga) would also deploy a central server to harvest the metadata from all such ETD repositories distributed in universities with an aim to provided unified access to theses and dissertations through its harvesting server.

Shodhganga replicates academic structure of each University in terms of Departments/ Centres/ Colleges each University has to facilitate ease of navigation. This structure facilitates research scholars from universities to deposit their theses in the respective Department / Centre / College. As shown in the Fig 1, option for simple search and advance search are available on the home page along with browsing facility through universities and departments. The Centre is also developing a semantic web-based interface to facilitate subject-based browsing, navigation, search and retrieval of content available in the repository.

Source and Search Available At:

[http://shodhganga.inflibnet.ac.in/]

Wednesday, February 20, 2013

IScienceSearch: The Internet Search Engine For Chemists & Biologists

iScienceSearch is a completely new further development of CWM Global Search

iScienceSearch is an innovative Internet search tool for scientists that want to search for chemical data on the Internet - it makes a federated search over many scientific databases on the Internet.

  • Search the Internet by structure!
  • Find structures for synonyms!
  • Submit several compound in one search - use SDFiles.
  • Find biological effects of a compound.
  • Get access to information that was until recently a very costly service.

 iScienceSearch allows searching the Internet by structure, synonym, CAS Registry Number and free text. In the background, we return structure, names and CAS Registry Numbers* within seconds.  A search by name can automatically invoke another search by structure and/or CAS Registry, or any combination of these. iScienceSearch presently searches more than 60 free chemical and pharma relevant databases  -- containing more than 100 million pages which associate chemical structures with data.

Source and Link Available At

[http://www.isciencesearch.com/]

Wednesday, February 13, 2013

DART-Europe: E-theses Portal


DART-Europe logo

DART-Europe is a partnership of research libraries and library consortia who are working together to improve global access to European research theses. DART-Europe is endorsed by LIBER (Ligue des Bibliothèques Européennes de Recherche), and it is the European Working Group of the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations (NDLTD).

The DART-Europe partners help to provide researchers with a single European Portal for the discovery of Electronic Theses and Dissertations (ETDs), and they participate in advocacy to influence future European e-theses developments. DART-Europe offers partners a European networking forum on ETD issues, and may provide the opportunity to submit collaborative funding applications to achieve DART-Europe's vision for ETDs.

Source and  Link Available At

[http://www.dart-europe.eu/]

Monday, January 14, 2013

Open Access : Copyright for Librarians: The Essential Handbook


"Copyright for Librarians" (CFL) is an online open curriculum on copyright law that was developed jointly with Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet and Society.

Re-designed as a brand new textbook, "Copyright for Librarians: the essential handbook" can be used as a stand-alone resource or as an adjunct to the online version which contains additional links and references for students who wish to pursue any topic in greater depth.

Delve into copyright theory or explore enforcement. With a new index and a handy Glossary, the Handbook is essential reading for librarians who want to hone their skills in 2013, and for anyone learning about or teaching copyright law in the information field.

Source and Links To Open Access Copy, Format, Language, and Platform Options, and Purchase Link Available At 

[http://www.eifl.net/news/cfl-essential-handbook-launches]

Inside Higher Ed > AAUP Publishes New Guidelines on Librarians



January 14, 2013 - 3:00am

The American Association of University Professors [AAUP] has updated guidelines for librarians to reflect their changing roles as teachers and researchers. The joint Statement on Faculty Status of College and University Librarians now includes language on technology in the library and recommends that institutions adequately compensate librarians for the 12-month cycles in which they typically work.

It also recommends that colleges and universities involve librarians in governance issues, such as curriculum development, said Deanna Wood, a reference librarian and associate professor of reference at the University of New Hampshire who helped draft the updated guidelines. That way, students won’t enter the library to do research and find “there’s nothing there to support it.”

The revised statement also reaffirms an earlier version’s call to consider librarians involved in teaching and research as faculty members and lauds their role as independent guardians of intellectual and academic freedom. Wood said while she and many fellow librarians at public land-grant universities are tenured faculty, the practice is rarer at private universities. It’s unclear what percentage of librarians are tenure-track faculty nationwide, she added.

A joint committee of AAUP and Association of College and Research Libraries [ACRL] members drafted the updates to the original, 1973 guidelines, which were approved by both groups last year.

Source and Link Available At 

[http://www.insidehighered.com/quicktakes/2013/01/14/aaup-publishes-new-guidelines-librarians]